Up On The Roof

When thinking of features you love about your home, rarely does the roof come to mind. We often think about the updating the kitchen, adding a bathroom and redoing the floors, but what is up on the roof frequently is forgotten (until a leak or other trouble arises). However, investing in the roof for your home can not only enhance the look of your property but can also add longevity of your home.

Asphalt Shingles

With an organic or fiberglass base, Due to the easy installation, lower cost and passable life expectancy, asphalt shingles can be found on roughly 80% of all homes.

CONS:
•In areas where the weather can change drastically, these tend to crack.
•As they are made from weaker material than other options, asphalt shingles become more damaged more quickly than other option.
•While the life expectancy is decent, it tends to be shorter than that compared of others, lasting anywhere from 15 to 40 years.

PROS:
•Asphalt shingles tend to be the most affordable roofing option, running approximately $5 per square foot. This largely depends on the type of shingle material chosen and the regional labor cots.*
•If you’re an experienced “do-it-yourself” type of home owner, the installation process may be within your scope.
•You’ll find a good variety of colors, styles and sizes of this form of roofing.
•More recent versions of asphalt shingles meet Energy Star standards, helping you save on electric bills.

Slate Roof

Slate roofs are made from actual stone pulled from rock quarries.

CONS:
•Installation requires a professional and costs run a wide (and high) range of prices, beginning with estimates at $10 per square foot and going up to $75 per square foot.*
•Due to the specialization required for this roofing style, if repairs are ever needed, they can be costly.
•Like tile roofs, slate roofs can be quite heavy so your house must be able to hold the additional weight.

PROS:
•This tends to be the most durable type of roof.
•Slate roofs can last 100 years or more, so while the installation costs may be high, that might be the only penny you spend on your roof.

Standing-Seam Metal Roof

These roofs are made of large panels of steel, aluminum, copper or zinc. They are laid with seams overlapping; the raised ridges align vertically with the slope of the roof.

CONS:
•Installation is not a “do-it-yourself” process; professional services will need to be used.
•The look is specific and doesn’t necessarily fit the aesthetic of every style of home.
•When rain and/or hail storms hit, the roof can create more noise than other options.

PROS:
•Installation costs run lower than other options, depending on the material used. Steel or aluminum can run $10 per square foot. Zinc can be $13 per square foot. Copper can reach up to $18 per square foot.*
•The life of a standing-seam metal roof can typically last from 30 to 50 years. Depending on when you purchased the home and the roof was installed, this could outlast your time in the home.
•A standing-seam metal roof tends to serve houses in zones known for wildfires well.
•This type of roof is known to be durable and typically free of maintenance concerns.

Tile Roofs – Cement or Clay

Primarily a choice for homes in California, Florida and the southwest region, roofs made of clay or cement tiles are sturdy and strong. Installed in overlapping layers, the tiles are typically made of terracotta clay or ceramic tiles from fired clay.

CONS:
•Professional installation is required and can be pricier than other options; estimates are $10 per square foot for concrete tiles, $15 to $20 per square foot for terracotta tiles, $20 per square foot for Spanish clay tiles, and $20 to $30 per square foot for ceramic tiles.*
•Your house must be able to hold the additional weight; they tend to be heavier than other roofing selections.

PROS:
•Tile roof roofing tends to open up more color options.
•Repairs are made relatively easier than other roof styles by sealing or filling cracks or holes with plastic roofing cement or prying up the broken tile and replacing it.
•When well maintained, this roof style can last 100 years or more which will outlast most home owners.

Wood Shingles


Are you sitting down? Wood shingles are shingles made out of – wood (shocking, right?). Cedar, redwood or yellow pine are more commonly used.

CONS:
•If you live in an area with a high fire risk (or just don’t want to increase that worry), wood shingles might not be your best choice.
•The look of your home may not be the best match for this style.
•Since this is not a “do-it-yourself” project, professional services will be needed.
•The lifespan for a wood shingle roof runs 25 to 30 years on average. If you plan to be in your home that long (or purchase the home well into the age of the wood shingle roof), a replacement may be in your future.

PROS:
•Wood shingles offer a more environmentally friendly option.
•This style is energy-efficient.
•While a bit higher than some options, wood shingles still run lower than others. Running between $6.50 to $11 per square foot, the initial installation costs could seem reasonable.*
•The character wood shingles provide could be the perfect icing on top.

While new roofing can be a costly endeavor, it can be a noticeable investment in your home, both visually and financially. If you would like help investigating this and other renovation projects on your home, contact The Crosby Team at First Choice Loan Services today!

*Prices are provided strictly as estimates. For more accurate and current pricing, please contact your trusted local roofing provider.

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